Tyler, The Creator Praises Pharrell’s ‘In My Mind’ On Its 15th Anniversary

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Pharrell’s debut album In My Mind dropped 15 years ago, and it was the first time fans got to know the megaproducer as a full-fledged artist. It debuted at No. 3 on the Billboard 200 chart and received a nomination for Best Rap Album at the 2007 Grammys. 

The album inspired several artists, such as Tyler, The Creator, who wanted to celebrate it with some nostalgia. On Sunday (July 25), Tyler took to Twitter to show his appreciation for the album that impacted his life. 

In My Mind turns 15 today,” Tyler tweeted next to a picture of him at 15 years old. “Came out around the time of this photo. Was at Hawthorne High summer school and man I cant articulate what it means/ did for me. I made Odd Future that summer and set out to be where I am now before 10th grade began. Very important piece of art to me.”

Tyler has expressed his appreciation for Pharrell and In My Mind in the past. For the album’s 10th anniversary in 2016, the Odd Future founder left a similar message on Instagram explaining how important the album was to him as a teenager. 

“BEING 15 BLACK NOT REALLY ‘INTERESTED’ IN WHAT THE MAJORITY OF MY PEERS WERE INTO, IT MADE ME FEEL SAFE,” Tyler wrote in the lengthy caption. “I WAS OPTIMISTIC, ALWAYS DAYDREAMING AND SETTING GOALS SO I FELT YOU WERE DIRECTLY SPEAKING TO ME.”

 

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For his latest studio album, CALL ME IF YOU GET LOST, Tyler was able to get Pharrell for a guest feature alongside Lil Uzi Vert on “Juggernaut.” Pharrell’s verse surprised fans on social media who were shocked to hear him rap again. For years, people have been calling on Pharrell to do an all-rap album. 

Billboard recently crowned Pharrell and Chad Hugo the greatest Hip Hop producers of the 21st century. They also came second on Billboard’s overall 50 Greatest Producers of the 21st Century list. Their dominance behind the boards crossed over into several genres outside of Hip Hop. 

Billboard described the iconic Virginia duo’s sound as “liquid guitars, clanging percussion, and the most intoxicating synth tones you’ve ever heard — usually kicked off with a four-stab count-off, and often punctuated with a keyboard sound like a dying firework — which played as big a part as anything in Hip Hop taking complete control of popular music in the ’00s.”