New Rock Hall of Fame Exhibit Spotlights 2019 Inductees

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Stage gear from Janet Jackson, Def Leppard, Stevie Nicks and Roxy Music included in just-opened exhibit in Cleveland.

It's one thing to watch from the cheap seats as Stevie Nicks twirls in one of her signature gauzy creations on the stage with Fleetwood Mac. It's quite another thing to get just inches away from one of the icon's Margi Kent-designed performance outfits from her 1983 Wild Heart solo tour and see the insanely intricate, colorful beadwork, silver fringe and lacy patterns from a way closer vantage point. That one-of-a-kind item, along with the tambourine from the cover of Nicks' debut 1981 solo album, Bella Donna, handwritten "Nightbird" and "Stand Back" lyrics and a handmade, calligraphy-covered dress from her "Sorcerer" video are among the rock treasures in a new exhibit that opened on Friday (22) at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland.

The intimate look at gear, clothes, lyrics, posters and programs from this year's slate of inductees -- which also includes Janet Jackson, The Cure, Def Leppard, Radiohead, Roxy Music and The Zombies -- sits just around the corner from the third floor spot where every inductee to date's names and signatures are immortalized on plaques, with this year's honorees just days away from joining them at Friday's (March 29) 34th annual ceremony at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn.

Just across from Nicks, the first woman to be inducted twice, is a collection of Jackson memorabilia, including a program from the singer's 2001 All For You Tour, the handwritten lyrics to her 1986 hit "Nasty," the flowing, feathery dress from the 2018 "Made For Now" video and the singer's military-style Rhythm Nation uniform.

Right next to Jackson is a paint-splattered white jumpsuit worn by Cure drummer/keyboardist Lol Tolhurst in the "Let's Go To Bed" video and an impressive collection of gear and stage clothes from British metal poppers Def Leppard, including drummer Rick Allen's signature Union Jack shorts from the "Bringin' On the Heartrbreak" video and one of the one-armed percussionists custom sets, complete with a panel of foot-triggers. 

Though their section is modest, one of the most fascination pieces in the inductees exhibit is a section of the city model from Radiohead's stop-motion 2016 "Burn the Witch" video directed by Chris Hopewell, which pays homage to the 1975 British horror film The Wicker Man. A more expansive collection from glam rockers Roxy Music is just to the left, including saxophone player Andy Mackay's 1979 TASCAM TEAC 144 portastudio, one of the first to allow musicians to record multiple instruments and vocal parts all at once. The recorder, which used standard-size cassettes, was clearly well-loved, as evidenced by the crack across the face of the plastic cassette cover.

The Bryan Ferry-fronted band also loaned out guitarist Phil Manzanera's electric blue Wendy Dagworthy-designed, country-inspired "Firebird" suit and Antony Price-created bejeweled silver sunglasses, as well as Ferry's black sparkly outfit from a 1973 performance of "Virginia Plain" on a German TV show and Brian Eno's thrift sale-special black feather shawl. A number of items from 1960s "Time of the Season" rockers The Zombies are also on display, including the original trippy Terry Quirk artwork from their landmark 1967 album Odessey and Oracle, singer Colin Bluntstones' white fisherman's sweater from the sessions for that album, a keyboard, several guitars and a satin jacket and program from the band's 1965 Dick Clark Caravan of Stars tour, which also featured Del Shannon and the Shangri-Las.

This year's Hall of Fame ceremony will take place on Friday in Brooklyn, with an edited version slated to air on HBO on Apr. 27.