Jam Master Jay Trial: 2 Co-Conspirators To Testify Against Murder Suspects

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New York, NY – Prosecutors reportedly believe they have an ironclad case in the murder of Run-DMC legend Jam Master Jay (real name Jason Mizell), who was fatally shot at his Queens studio in 2002. According to AllHipHop, two co-conspirators who allegedly helped suspects Ronald Washington and Karl Jordan plan the murder are expected to testify in court against the two co-defendants.

Last week, Jordan asked a judge to release him from Brooklyn’s Metropolitan Detention Center on bail. Jordan claimed he’d put together a $1 million bail package, which included property from family members and $20,000 from his friends.

Jordan said two people will testify he was at his pregnant ex-girlfriend’s house at the time of the murder. The ex-girlfriend and a former corrections officer will reportedly take the stand in support of his alibi once the trial begins. But two unnamed “conspirators” are scheduled to testify against Jordan during the court proceedings.

Washington and Jordan were indicted on first-degree murder charges nearly 20 years after Jam Master Jay’s death — and prosecutors are confident they’ll get a conviction.

“The evidence adduced at trial will be substantial, including eyewitness and co-conspirator testimony establishing Jordan’s relationship with Washington, his involvement in the underlying narcotics conspiracy, and his role as Mizell’s shooter,” United States Attorney Breon Peace wrote in opposition to Jordan’s bond request. “While Jordan claims that there is little evidence linking him to Mizell’s murder, he ignores the fact that a grand jury has heard evidence – twice – and voted an indictment charging him with these crimes.”

Prosecutors accused Jordan of intimidating at least four of the witnesses in the Jam Master Jay case as well. They said Jordan communicated with people illegally from inside the MDC after being caught with a contraband cell phone. Prosecutors want the judge to keep Jordan locked up until the trial.

Jury selection for the case will begin on September 22, while opening statements and testimony will commence on September 26 — barring any scheduling conflicts due to the COVID-19 pandemic. If the pandemic does cause any issues, a backup trial date will be set for February 2023. The government expects the trial to last roughly two weeks.